Requirements for Registration

The following lists represent the registration requirements for each breed. Items listed under Traits Discriminated Against are not necessarily a disqualification from Registration; however, excessive traits listed as discriminating may render that sheep ineligible for registration, if, at the inspectors and board of directors discretion, such traits seriously challenge the breed identity. Sheep with any Disqualifying Traits are not eligible for registration and will be denied registration.

American Heavy Horned Black Hawaiian Corsican Desert Sand Multi-horned Hair Mouflon New Mexico Dahl Painted Desert Texas Dall

American Heavy Horned Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • United Horned Hair Sheep Association, Inc., reserves the right to request additional photos showing horns, coat or other attributes of the sheep for which registration or recording is requested.
  • Known background of only Painted Desert, Black Hawaiian, Desert Sand, Texas Dall, Corsican, Mouflon, Multi-horned Hair, and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Horned Merino, Horned Dorset, Jacob, and Navajo Churro in addition to the noted known Bighorn, Stumberg Alaskan Dall or other primitive breeds (at the discretion of UHHSA, Inc.).
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known polled bloodlines
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of crossbreeding shown by physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of sheep in this division such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi-horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Tails reaching to the hock

Background/Heritage:

Sheep within this division are the results of the efforts of breeders through the years to increase body size and horn basal circumference, utilizing native or primitive sheep along with the Black Hawaiian, Corsican, Desert Sand, Mouflon, Multi-horned hair, Painted Desert, and Texas Dall Sheep. While called the American Heavy Horned Division, this does not limit influences to breeds classified as “heavy horned” versus “thin horned” in literature as some literature classifies Alaskan Dall as “thinhorn”.  The name of the division is a recognition of shepherds’ goals of increased basal circumference.

Information about any known background of the ancestral breeds should be included in pedigrees with their percentages of the breeds noted to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered. This information should include any known wool breeds in the bloodlines.

Classifications: (may have more than one)  It is useful to utilize these abbreviations for your farm breeding records to help provide more information to perspective buyers. The abbreviations may appear on the Registry Certificates as well. 

  • A = Alaskan Dall influence   
  • B = Bighorn influence with subclasses below based on the classification in Toweill and Geist (1999) for breeders usage:           
    • R = Rocky Mountain Bighorn – larger blocky bodies, with heavy horns and tending more toward a tighter curl.           
    • C = California Bighorn – smaller bodies, horns wider curls           
    • D = Desert Bighorn – smaller bodies   
  • S = Stumberg influence (Mouflon and Argali)  
  • O = Other influence

Black Hawaiian Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • All black coat. United Horned Hair Sheep Association, Inc., reserves the right to request additional photos showing horns, coat, or other attributes of the sheep for which registration or recording is requested.
  • Gray or white muzzle or graying around the eyes is acceptable at this time as this may be due to aging
  • Known background of only Mouflon, American Blackbelly and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Merino, and Navajo Churro
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known polled bloodlines
  • Rams that are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by physical appearance of breeds that are not included in the history or background of Black Hawaiian Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Known spotted genetics or other recent nonstandard color ancestors other than what is listed as acceptable
  • Distinct variegated coloring in the horns or the hooves. Not to be confused with a washing out of color due to aging.

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi-horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

Black Hawaiian Sheep are a naturally shedding, all black hair sheep with Mouflon Sheep influence in ancestry. All rams must have horns, and the ewes are allowed to have horns although most ewes are polled. Rams must not exhibit scurs instead of horns, while ewes with scurs are acceptable.

For the Open Registry application and inspection process, the Sheep should not contain, to the best knowledge of the owner, any polled blood or other types of polled bloodlines, including but not limited to Dorper, Katahdin, and St. Croix sheep breeds. Horned Ancestry bloodlines accepted are Mouflon, American Blackbelly, Corsican, Horned Rambouillet, Merino, or Navajo Churro.  Because of the chance for spotting, the parent wool breeds which may produce spotting in the progeny should be considered a potential disqualification. The sheep must be 1/8th or less of any of the ancestral breeds.

The sheep must generally completely shed, and additional pictures showing the completely shed sheep may be required for registration if the pictures submitted do not clearly show the sheep shedding or having shed.

Information about ALL known backgrounds of the sheep should be included in pedigrees to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered.

Nonstandard Color Producing Black Hawaiian Sheep

What to do when sheep which are registered as Black Hawaiian when mated with another registered Black Hawaiian Sheep, produces nonstandard coloring.  Are these nonstandard color producers then still considered Black Hawaiian Sheep or are the offspring simply expressing a color phase?  For UHHSA and the Black Hawaiian Registry Division purposes at this time, a Black Hawaiian Sheep will be defined as an all-black sheep which, when bred to all black sheep normally produces all black sheep and which has no known spotting genetics in the known pedigrees of the sheep.

While some market opportunities do not require such distinction, for registration and breeding purposes of a Black Hawaiian Sheep, production of spotting and color variances in addition to the allowable colors listed above should matter and is highly discriminated against.  Animals displaying nonstandard coloring will not be eligible for registration as a Black Hawaiian Sheep.  UHHSA and the Black Hawaiian Registry expects its members to fully disclose any known spotting or nonstandard coloring that exists in their Black Hawaiian Flocks and work on minimizing spotting and the chance for spotting or nonstandard coloring to the best of their abilities.

While each shepherd needs to make decisions on their flock management, it is strongly suggested that if a registered ram or registered ewe is shown to produce nonstandard coloring with different mates, that the sheep be removed from the Black Hawaiian breeding program.

If Any Sheep are produced which do not meet the color standards for the Black Hawaiian Registry, PLEASE consider registering them with the Painted Desert Registry division of UHHSA if they match the Painted Desert Breed Standard or another division within UHHSA if they match the division’s Breed Standards.


Corsican Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • Known background of only Black Hawaiian,  Mouflon, Corsican, or American Blackbelly Sheep and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Merino, and Navajo Churro
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability
  • No white coloring except as part of the Mouflon Pattern or Badger face

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known recent polled bloodlines
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of the Corsican Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Known spotted genetics or other nonstandard coloring in pedigrees

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

Corsican are a naturally shedding, colored hair sheep with Mouflon Sheep influence in ancestry. All rams must have horns, and the ewes are allowed to have horns although most ewes are polled. Rams must not exhibit scurs instead of horns, while ewes with scurs are acceptable.

For the Open Registry application and inspection process, the Sheep should not contain, to the best knowledge of the owner, any recent polled blood or other types of polled bloodlines, including but not limited to Dorper, Katahdin, and St. Croix sheep breeds. Horned Ancestry bloodlines accepted are Black Hawaiian, American Blackbelly, Corsican, Mouflon, Horned Rambouillet, Merino,  or Navajo Churro, sheep breeds.  To maintain the color patterns of the Corsican Sheep, wool sheep parent breeds such as the Jacob which may cause spotting would be considered a potential disqualification. The sheep must consist of 1/8th or less of parent wool breeds and meet all other breed registration requirements.

The Sheep must generally completely shed, and additional pictures showing the completely shed sheep may be required for registration if the pictures submitted does not clearly show the sheep shedding or having shed.

Information about ALL known background should be included in pedigrees to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered.

Nonstandard Color Producing Corsican Sheep:

What to do when sheep which are registered as Corsicans when mated with another registered Corsican Sheep, produces nonstandard coloring.  Are these nonstandard color producers then still considered Corsican Sheep or are the offspring simply expressing a color phase?  For UHHSA, Inc. and the Corsican Sheep Registry Division purposes at this time, a Corsican Sheep will be defined as a sheep with the above-described coloring and patterns which, when bred to sheep with the same above described coloring and patterns normally produces offspring within the standard coloring and which has no known spotting genetics in the known pedigrees of the sheep.

While some market opportunities do not require such distinction, for registration and breeding purposes of a Corsican Sheep, production of spotting and color variances in addition to the allowable colors listed above should matter and is highly discriminated against.  Animals displaying nonstandard coloring will not be eligible for registration as a Corsican Sheep.  UHHSA, Inc. and the Corsican Sheep Registry expect its members to fully disclose any known spotting or nonstandard coloring that exists in their Corsican Flocks and work on minimizing spotting and the chance for spotting or nonstandard coloring to the best of their abilities.

While each shepherd needs to make decisions on their flock management, it is strongly suggested that if a registered ram or registered ewe is shown to produce nonstandard coloring with different mates, that the sheep be removed from the Corsican breeding program.

If any sheep are produced which do not meet the color standards for the Corsican Sheep Registry, PLEASE consider registering them with the Painted Desert Registry division of UHHSA if they match the Painted Desert Breed Standard or another division within UHHSA if they match the division’s Breed Standards.


Desert Sand Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

Rams must have horns

  • Light to dark shades of Champagne, Cinnamon, and Copper
  • No distinct black spots or other distinct spotting on the nose or nose pads or body; however, white saddle patches from strong Mouflon influence is allowed
  • Known background of only Texas Dall, Desert Sand (Red Dalls, Champagne Dalls), Mouflon, and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Merino, and Navajo Churro
  • At this time Jacob wool ancestry as well as Hair ancestry of Black Hawaiian, American Blackbelly, Corsican, and Painted Desert is accepted
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known recent polled bloodlines
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro, or Jacob
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by the physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of Desert Sand Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Black horns or extremely contrasted variegated horns

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a normal basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks
  • Sheep with close spotting genetics

Background/Heritage:

Desert Sand Sheep are naturally shedding, generally light to dark shades in color. All rams must have horns, and the ewes are allowed to have horns although most ewes are polled. Rams must not exhibit scurs instead of horns, while ewes with scurs are acceptable.

Desert Sand Sheep have been called Red Dalls and Champagne Dalls.  To some, the different coloring and lighter face and extremities are just a color phase of the all-white Texas Dalls.  To others, the different coloring is indicative of something other than the pure white of the Texas Dall sheep in the background, such as possibly some Black Hawaiian or American Blackbelly or close Mouflon influence.

For the Open Registry application and inspection process, the Sheep should not contain, to the best knowledge of the owner, any polled blood or other types of polled bloodlines, including but not limited to Dorper, Katahdin, and St. Croix sheep breeds. Horned Ancestry bloodlines accepted are Texas Dall,  Mouflon, American Blackbelly, Corsican, Black Hawaiian, Horned Rambouillet, Merino, or Navajo Churro.  Because of the chance for spotting, the wool breeds which may produce spotting have the potential to be a disqualification .  It is not an absolute disqualification at this time to have sheep with Jacob (a spotted wool breed) or Painted Desert Sheep in the pedigrees; however, the goal is to produce sheep with the coloring of the Desert Sand Sheep and the spotted genetics might interfere with that goal.

To be registered, Desert Sand sheep must consist of 1/8th or less of parent wool breeds and meet all other breed standards.Desert Sand Sheep which are recently bred from wool lines and include only the listed parent wool sheep breeds, must completely shed and additional pictures showing the completely shed sheep may be required for registration if the pictures submitted does not clearly show the sheep shedding or having shed.

Information about any known background of the ancestral breeds should be included in pedigrees with their percentages of the breeds noted to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered. This information should include any known wool breeds in the bloodlines.

Nonstandard Color Producing Desert Sand Sheep:

What to do when sheep which are registered as Desert Sand when mated with another Desert Sand Sheep, produces non-standard coloring.  Are these color producers then still considered Desert Sand Sheep or are the offspring simply expressing a color phase?  For UHHSA and the Desert Sand Sheep Registry Division purposes at this time, a Desert Sand Sheep will be defined as a light to dark-colored champagne, cinnamon, or copper-colored sheep which, when bred to the same normally produces the same standard coloring and which has no known spotting genetics in the known pedigrees of the sheep.

While some market opportunities do not require such distinction, for registration and breeding purposes of a Desert Sand Sheep, production of spotting and color variances in addition to the allowable colors listed above should matter and is highly discriminated against.  Animals displaying nonstandard coloring will not be eligible for registration as a Desert Sand Sheep.  

UHHSA and the Desert Sand Registry expects its members to fully disclose any known spotting or other nonstandard coloring that exists in their Desert Sand Flocks and work on minimizing spotting and the chance for spotting or other nonstandard coloring to the best of their abilities.

While each shepherd needs to make decisions on their flock management, it is strongly suggested that if a registered ram or registered ewe is shown to produce nonstandard coloring with different mates, that sheep be removed from the Desert Sand breeding program.

If Any Sheep are produced which do not meet the color standards for the Desert Sand Registry, PLEASE consider registering them with the Painted Desert Registry division of UHHSA if they match the Painted Desert Breed Registration Requirements or another division within UHHSA if they match the division’s Breed Registration Requirements.


Multi-horned Hair Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns.  If one or more parents are unknown, rams must display 3 or more horns.
  • Ewes may be horned or polled or scurred.  If one or more parents are unknown, ewes must display 3 or more horns.
  • Known background of the following hair sheep breeds: Painted Desert, Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Desert Sand, Mouflon, Corsican, American Blackbelly, Wiltshire Horn, NM Dahl, and NM Onate Sheep.
  • Known background of only the following wool breeds: Jacob, Horned Rambouillet, Merino (Horned), Horned Dorset, Navajo-Churro, and Manx
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known polled bloodlines
  • Sheep with known recent Big Horn or Alaskan Dall bloodlines
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Jacob, Horned Rambouillet, Merino (Horned), Horned Dorset, Navajo-Churro, and Manx
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by the physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of Multi-horned sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi-horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

Because of the influence of Jacob and Navajo-Churro Sheep (wool breeds), certain bloodlines of Painted Desert, Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Desert Sand, and Corsican Sheep have displayed more than two horns (Polycerate horns). The sheep which visibly display the polycerate horns have been tracked in the UHHSA pedigrees using the designation MH for the multi-horned sheep.

Some breeders have singled the multi-horned sheep out and bred pedigrees with nothing but shedding sheep that are producing and/or displaying 3, 4, 5, and 6 horns.  In addition, breeders are working hard to overcome the sex link gene(s) which results(s) in polled ewes who produce multi-horned sheep.  The goal is to produce ewes which will actually display either 2 or more horns while continuing to shed their winter coats and exhibit a slick summer hair coat so shearing remains unnecessary.

In 2012, the Board of Directors of the United Horned Hair Sheep Association chose to recognize the efforts of the multi-horned hair sheep breeders by creating a single,  unique breed division specifically for multi-horned hair sheep without regard to color or color pattern displayed. While some of these special sheep may still be recorded/registered as Painted Desert, Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Corsican, or Desert Sand Sheep if they meet the registration requirements of those breeds, many breeders simply prefer to keep their multi-horned sheep as a unique and separate but related breed.

Recognizing the Multi-horned breed is in it’s infancy stage, the Board of Directors chose to allow breeders the opportunity to produce the best multi-horned sheep possible.  The Board of Directors chose to define the background of registerable Multi-horned Sheep as those sheep with only the following hair/shedding sheep breeds in the known background/pedigrees: Painted Desert, Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Desert Sand, Mouflon, Corsican, American Blackbelly, Wiltshire Horn, NM Dahl, and NM Onate Sheep. Bighorn and Alaskan Dall sheep are not allowed in recent known pedigrees.

Some breeders may have used wool breeds in the known sheep background/pedigrees.  These wool breeds are limited to the following wool sheep breeds: Jacob, Horned Rambouillet, Merino (Horned), Horned Dorset, Navajo-Churro, and Manx.  However, registerable Multi-horned Sheep must contain 1/8th or less wool breeds, display a hair coat and shed completely. Sheep which have polled sheep breeds or other sheep breeds in the known pedigrees do not meet the other breed division requirements.

With setting definitions of the breed, UHHSA hopes to enable Multi-horned Sheep breeders to utilize the best sheep to create and fulfill their breeding goals.  Now all of these multi-horned and multi-horn producing sheep will have a well-deserved place with UHHSA.

Sheep which are registered in another recognized registry for multi-horned and multi-horned producing sheep are qualified for registration in the UHHSA Multi-horned Hair Sheep Breed Registry providing UHHSA Registration Requirements are met. Sheep which are dual registered with other recognized registries may also be dually registered with UHHSA as long as UHHSA Registration Requirements are met.  Please read carefully the registration requirements/standards of the breed divisions to determine if your sheep meets the requirements for dually registered sheep.  

UHHSA, Inc, registered Painted Desert Sheep, Texas Dall Sheep, Black Hawaiian Sheep, Corsican Sheep, and Desert Sand Sheep which display 3 or more horns may be dually registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep if desired.

At the membership meeting held January 26, 2013, the membership voted to recognize and add the Multi-horned Hair Sheep Registry Division to UHHSA, Inc, in official recognition and acceptance of multi-horned breed efforts.

Registration Classes for Multi-horned Hair Sheep:

  • CLASS A – Both parents are Registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep.  In addition, all great grandparents and grandparents are either Registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep or exhibit 3+ horns.
  • CLASS B – Both parents are Registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep.  In addition, all grandparents are either Registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep or exhibit 3+ horns.
  • CLASS C – Both parents are Registered as Multi-horned Hair Sheep.
  • CLASS D – One parent is unknown but sheep (to be registered) has 3+ horns.  If sheep does not have 3+ horns, sheep may not be registered as a Multi-horned Hair Sheep.
  • CLASS E – Both parents are unknown. Sheep to be registered has 3+ horns.  If sheep does not have 3+ horns, sheep may not be registered as a Multi-horned sheep.

Mouflon Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • Color as per Breed Standards must be exhibited with limited individual variances. United Horned Hair Sheep Association, Inc., reserves the right to request additional photos showing horns, coats, or other attributes of the sheep for which registration or recording is requested.
  • Mature rams must display a white saddle patch during the winter
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability
  • Tails must be less than 4 inches or 11 coccygeal vertebrae in length

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with a known background which contains sheep other than Mouflon Sheep
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Ewes with scurs (not applicable to ewes with short horns or horns which had broke off)
  • Tails more than 4 inches or 11 coccygeal vertebrae
  • Docked tails
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Entropion (inverted eye lids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns touching the face or neck at maturity and causing a health issue which is not monitored by the owner
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis

New Mexico Dahl Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Horns must show on registration photos for both ewes and rams when both or one parent is unregistered
  • 1/8 or less of wool or other sheep parent breeds
  • 25% or less of Bighorn blood is allowed.
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with more than two horns (such as Jacob Sheep)
  • Sheep that are polled
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Sheep with known Jacob bloodlines
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under/overbite, with distinct space between teeth & edge of dental  pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of New Mexico Dahl Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc,
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Elf or Gopher Ears

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which come within three inches of the face at maturity
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under/overbite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching all the way to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

New Mexico Dahl White and Oñate Sheep should not be confused with Alaska Dahl or Texas Dall Sheep.  They have separate and distinct origins and history.  Alaska Dahl sheep are wild mountain sheep native to Alaska while domestic Texas Dall sheep were created in the mid-1900s by crossing a hair sheep breed, Mouflon, with a woolen Rambouillet breed.  The New Mexico Dahl sheep have much deeper roots in American History.  According to John Baxter’s book “Los Carneradas”, Francisco Vásquez de Coronado y Luján brought sheep in 1540 seeking the mystical Seven Golden Cities of Cibola. Coronado and his supporters sank a fortune in his ill-fated enterprise taking 1300 horses and mules for riding and packing and hundreds of head of sheep and cattle as a portable food supply. Much to his chagrin, Coronado’s greatest legacy was the wild American Southwest. When Don Juan de Oñate came with colonists to establish settlements in this vast land they brought 4000 sheep and began the first cowboy ranching and livestock industry in Nuevo Mexico. Nuevo Mexico exported salt, piñon, and hides. On January 26, 1598, Don Juan de Oñate left Zacatecas, Mexico, and arrived in the Kingdom of New Mexico April 30, 1598, to establish the first significant infusion of colonists, a settlement in the New Mexico Kingdom; (Jamestown was founded in 1607 in Virginia, and the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth MA in 1620). By 1827 the NM sheep industry had grown to one-quarter of a million sheep, with 65% being in the Alburquerque area.

Many hardships were endured by the individuals raising and trading livestock. To name a few there was experimentation with less hardy breeds, the constant raiding by the Indians, and the 1828 epidemic break out which affected the sheep industry in Durango, Mexico. Two hundred fifty-thousand (250,000) head were lost which made the long and dangerous trip profitable for New Mexico sheepherders who presumably raised a hardier breed. The Candelaria family tried to improve the breed with merinos because their wool had more lanolin but their hooves were too soft and they could not adapt to the rough New Mexico terrain. Spanish archives show that Spanish expedition planners investigated years in advance and invested vast personal fortunes into the planning and preparation of their expeditions.  That is well documented. A key element of survival and success is the advanced planning of food and water supply.  Any such undertaking would have certainly begged the question, what kind of animal has the stamina to endure the unknown and yet untold distances of the new world, and inherent in their own ability to survive hardship, thusly keep us alive?  Willful goats and pigs have their own ideas and are more labor-intensive.  The lives of Coronado and his men depended on the survival of his food source on the hoof.  Hair sheep could go where cattle and woolen sheep could not so these hair sheep were the best bet and obvious choice for Coronado. Clearly, the hair sheep were the best gamble for expeditions like that of Coronado.  Given the legacy of Coronado and others like him, these ancestors of the New Mexico Dahl sheep have long been true to this hardiness claim.  They have over the past quarter-century reemerged and are extant today.  This is one of nature’s miracles and a credit to the ranchero planners and breeders of anonymity and antiquity.  

The Background/Heritage was written by Donald A. Chavez y Gilbert


Painted Desert Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • At least 2 colors with a separately distinguishable area of white which shows on registration photos. United Horned Hair Sheep Association, Inc., reserves the right to request additional photos showing horns, coat or other attributes of the sheep for which registration or recording is requested
  • Solid colored and sheep without separately distinguishable area of white which shows on registration photos or who are solid white color may be RECORDED if both parents are registered Painted Desert Sheep or if one parent is Registered and the other parent is Recorded
  • Known background of only Painted Desert, Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Desert Sand, Mouflon, Corsican Sheep and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Jacob, and Navajo Churro
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known recent polled bloodlines
  • Rams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro, or Jacob
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by the physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of Painted Desert Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Any solid colored sheep born from two Recorded Parents or with one parent which is not Registered or Recorded

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi-horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

Painted Desert Sheep are naturally shedding spotted hair sheep. All rams must have horns, and the ewes are allowed to have horns although most ewes are polled. Rams must not exhibit scurs instead of horns, while ewes with scurs are acceptable.

For the Open Registry, the sheep should not contain, to the best knowledge of the owner, any polled blood or other types of polled bloodlines, including but not limited to Dorper, Katahdin, and St. Croix sheep breeds. Horned Ancestry bloodlines accepted are Black Hawaiian, Texas Dall, Desert Sand, American Blackbelly, Corsican, Mouflon, Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro, or Jacob sheep breeds. To be registered, Painted Desert sheep must consist of 1/8th or less of parent wool breeds and meet all other registration requirements.

Painted Desert Sheep must completely shed and additional pictures showing the completely shed sheep may be required for registration if the pictures submitted do not clearly show the sheep shedding or having shed.

Information about ALL known backgrounds should be included to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered.


Texas Dall Sheep

TRAITS REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION:

  • Rams must have horns
  • All white coat. United Horned Hair Sheep Association, Inc., reserves the right to request additional photos showing horns, coat, or other attributes of the sheep for which registration or recording is requested.
  • No black or other color visible on the nose and lips with only MINIMAL light pigmentation around the eyelid margin (see pictures below)
  • Known background of only Texas Dall, Mouflon, and wool parent breeds of Horned Rambouillet, Merino, and Navajo Churro
  • 1/8th or less of wool parent breeds
  • Sheep at maturity normally exhibiting shedding ability

DISQUALIFICATIONS:

  • Sheep with known polled bloodlinesRams which are polled or have scurs at maturity
  • Tails past the hocks
  • Docked tails
  • Sheep with more than 1/8th known wool breeding from the parent breeds – Horned Rambouillet, Merino, Navajo Churro
  • Sheep with known recent Jacob bloodlines
  • Sheep with any known wool breeding from any non-parent wool breed
  • Hermaphroditism
  • One or both testicles not descended
  • Severe under or over bite, with distinct space between teeth and edge of dental pad
  • Evidence of cross breeding shown by the physical appearance of breeds which are not included in the history or background of Texas Dall Sheep such as Suffolk, Hampshire, Dorper, Katahdin, St Croix, etc.
  • Entropion (inverted eyelids) or other genetic eyelid defects
  • Naturally occurring droopy or floppy ears on adults
  • Known spotted genetics or other recent nonstandard (not all white) colored ancestors other than listed ancestors above
  • Distinct black coloring in the horns or the hooves which should be considered white
  • Color other than pink on the nose and the lips (see pictures above for examples of too much coloring)
  • More than a limited amount of light brown pigmentation on the eyelid margins (see pictures above for examples of too much coloring)

TRAITS DISCRIMINATED AGAINST (considered a fault):

  • Rams’ horns which touch the face at maturity
  • For multi-horned animals – fused horns
  • Extra Teats on ewes
  • Slight under or over bite, with teeth just barely touching the edge of the dental pad
  • Sheep which do not shed out completely at maturity on a general basis
  • Minimal light brown pigmentation around the eyelid margins
  • Mature rams with no mane at any time
  • Tails reaching to the hocks

Background/Heritage:

Texas Dall Sheep are naturally shedding, all-white hair sheep with Mouflon Sheep influence in ancestry. All rams must have horns, and the ewes are allowed to have horns although most ewes are polled. Rams must not exhibit scurs instead of horns, while ewes with scurs are acceptable.

The first Texas Dalls were first called Snow Sheep and were the results of accidental matings between Mouflon Ewes and Horned Rambouillet Rams.

For the Open Registry inspection and registration process, the Sheep should not contain, to the best knowledge of the owner, any polled blood or other types of polled bloodlines, including but not limited to Dorper, Katahdin, and St. Croix sheep breeds. Horned Ancestry bloodlines accepted are Texas Dall,  Mouflon, Horned Rambouillet, Merino, or Navajo Churro.  Because of the chance for spotting, the parent wool breed (Jacob) which may produce spotting in the progeny would probably be considered a disqualification. To be registered, Texas Dall sheep must consist of 1/8th or less of parent wool breeds and meet all other breed registration requirements.

Texas Dall Sheep must completely shed and additional pictures showing the completely shed sheep may be required for registration if the pictures submitted do not clearly show the sheep shedding or having shed.

Information about any known background should be included in the pedigrees to assist breeders in choosing bloodlines. If a sheep is unregistered, the animal should be clearly labeled as unregistered.

Nonstandard Color Producing Texas Dall Sheep:

What to do when sheep which are registered as Texas Dall when mated with another Texas Dall Sheep, produces the occasional fawn spotting or other nonstandard coloring which does not disappear.  Are these color producers then still considered Texas Dall Sheep or are the offspring simply expressing a color phase?  For UHHSA and the Texas Dall Registry Division  purposes at this time, a Texas Dall Sheep will be defined as an all white sheep which, when bred to all white sheep normally produces all white sheep and which has no known spotting genetics in the known pedigrees of the sheep.

While some market opportunities do not require such distinction, for registration and breeding purposes of a Texas Dall Sheep, production of spotting and color variances should matter and is highly discriminated against.   Animals displaying nonstandard coloring are not eligible for registration as Texas Dall Sheep.  UHHSA, Inc. and the Texas Dall Registry expects its members to fully disclose any known spotting that exists in their Texas Dall Flocks and work on minimizing spotting and the chance for spotting or nonstandard coloring to the best of their abilities.

While each shepherd needs to make decisions on their flock management, it is strongly suggested that if a registered ram or registered ewe is shown to produce nonstandard coloring with different mates, that sheep be removed from the Texas Dall breeding program.

If Any Sheep are produced which do not meet the color standards for the Texas Dall Registry, PLEASE consider registering them with the Painted Desert Registry division of UHHSA if they match the Painted Desert Registration Requirements or another division within UHHSA if they match the breed’s Registration Requirements.